Conspiracy theories and collective consciousness

Conspiracies baffle me. Any conspiracy; name one, I will be baffled. I concede they are attractive, with all the coincidental evidence they put together to guide our minds toward a strong conclusion. But for me, that’s where the attraction stops. But I’m not immune, I’ve been roped into a conspiracy or two in my life. Then the same thing happened each time. Once I bought into the theory sold to me, I noticed holes in the concept. Then I ask myself hard questions about the irregularities, and finally, I let the theory go. Each time I would ask myself how I could let my mind slip into such a convoluted idea. But that’s the thing. A good conspiracy theory will accumulate half-truths and almost verifiable information and blend it with far-reaching conclusions to make the circumstantial evidence seem more important.

And how does this work into the collective consciousness? For starters, the collective consciousness, aka collective unconscious, is born from neutral energy. It is sent to us from the Cosmos in the form of chaotic bursts of energy. The power contained in the collective unconscious comes to us with no intentions, good or bad. We transform it with our actions and choices. As proprietors of a thing called free will, we have the responsibility to use the energy bestowed on us in the best way possible. When a conspiracy theory gains traction, the collective unconscious is shaken. When a theory floods our feeds with waves of information, it’s easier for the brain to accept it as truth, that’s how the brain works. These brainwaves will then merge into the collective, making it unstable. That’s why we must work at being fully conscious and focused when our curiosity pulls us into a conspiracy. When you do that, the inadequacies of the theory will become apparent.

On that note, one inadequacy that's always present is the fact that most conspiracies require that our political and/or industrial leaders be on the same page, which is impossible. Look at any conspiracy theory and then look at the amount of misinformation that is needed to be produced. Then look at who is producing the information, take a good long look at this part. Then ask yourself, could my senator, president, prime minister, or whatever representative, be able to pull this off? My answer is no, every time. The reason is simple, most theories assert that a large group of people is colluding toward a common goal. And if it’s political, it often is something that has been going on for years, which means opposing political parties held the reigns of the conspiracy… I mean, come on!

To conclude, although conspiracies are part of the human experience, I urge any and everyone to go back to the theory you ascribe to and start asking it some hard questions. I believe that if we can all raise our minds above the current cacophony, the theories that have a hold on us will lose their appeal. Once that is accomplished, we will be able to see our society with clear eyes.